UPDATE SATURDAY 5 PM:  Tropical Depression Eighteen has strengthened to become the 16th named storm of the season. Tropical Storm Philippe is also now moving north and expected to move across the Florida Keys and extreme South Florida overnight.

KEY MESSAGES
  1. Forecast track has shifted west to include more of South Florida, but strongest winds will stay just offshore.
  2. Heavy rain is primary hazard, with localized flooding possible.
  3. Strongest rain bands could produce 30 to 40 mph wind gusts and an isolated risk of a tornado.
NHC Track
Alerts
Rain
Satellite

000
WTNT33 KNHC 292032
TCPAT3

BULLETIN
Remnants Of Philippe Advisory Number 9
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL182017
500 PM EDT Sun Oct 29 2017

…PHILIPPE DISSIPATES OVER THE WESTERN ATLANTIC…
…THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY…

SUMMARY OF 500 PM EDT…2100 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————-
LOCATION…31.0N 75.0W
ABOUT 290 MI…470 KM S OF CAPE HATTERAS NORTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…60 MPH…95 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNE OR 20 DEGREES AT 46 MPH…74 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…991 MB…29.27 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
At 500 PM EDT (2100 UTC), the remnants of Philippe were located near
latitude 31.0 North, longitude 75.0 West. The remnants of Philippe
have merged with a frontal system and are moving toward the
north-northeast near 46 mph (74 km/h).

Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 km/h) with higher gusts.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 230 miles (370 km)
from the center. Nearby NOAA buoy 41002 recently reported a
sustained wind of 43 mph (69 km/h) and a gust to 54 mph (87 km/h).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 991 mb (29.27 inches)
based on data from NOAA buoy 41002.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
None.

NEXT ADVISORY
————-
This is the last public advisory issued by the National Hurricane
Center on this system.

$$
Forecaster Stewart

000
WTNT43 KNHC 292032
TCDAT3

Remnants Of Philippe Discussion Number 9
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL182017
500 PM EDT Sun Oct 29 2017

During the past few hours, strong vertical wind shear in excess of
50 kt, plus merger with a cold front, has taken its toll on
Philippe’s previously well-defined low-level circulation. The system
has become elongated north-to-south within the frontal zone, and a
new low-level center may have developed about 150 nmi farther north
along the frontal boundary near NOAA buoy 41002. Now that Philippe
has lost any tropical or subtropical characteristics due to merger
with a synoptic-scale cold front, the system is declared to have
dissipated.

Much of the latent heat and deep convection associated with
Philippe’s remnants will likely be drawn into a larger extratropical
low pressure that is developing near the outer banks of North
Carolina, aiding in that intensification process. Although the
developing powerful low near the Outer Banks is not directly
associated with Philippe, interests along the mid-Atlantic and
southern New England coasts should closely monitor forecast products
issued by the NOAA Weather Prediction Center, NOAA Ocean Prediction
Center, and your local National Weather Service forecast office.

FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT 29/2100Z 31.0N 75.0W 50 KT 60 MPH
12H 30/0600Z…ABSORBED BY FRONTAL SYSTEM

$$
Forecaster Stewart

Original story posted early Saturday…

A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for portions of South Florida, including the Miami metro area and from Craig Key to Golden Beach. Tropical Storm Warnings are in effect the offshore waters from Marathon to West Palm. Tropical Storm force winds are possible in the watch area in the next 24 hours, but more likely in the warned areas over water.

The latest advisory issued comes as Potential Tropical Cyclone Eighteen was upgraded to a Tropical Depression. Maximum sustained winds were at 35 mph, and Tropical Depression Eighteen was moving to the north-northeast at 22 mph.  Wind gusts up to 35 mph are possible in the heavier rain bands, especially in areas under a Tropical Storm Watch.

Bands of heavy rain will spread from the Florida Keys northward into much of South Florida by Saturday night. Two to four inches of rain are possible in extreme southeast Florida, with one to three inches of rain possible near and south of a line extending from Fort Myers to Melbourne.  A Flood Watch has been issued for all counties along the Treasure Coast from Fort Lauderdale  to Vero Beach.

There is also a risk for isolated tornadoes in the Florida Keys, Miami Dade and Broward counties through Sunday morning. The system will race away from the state quickly Sunday and merge with a cold front to bring stormy weather to much of the Northeast U.S.

Meteorologist Jeff Huffman

Meteorologist Jeff Huffman is no stranger to just about every type of weather. Growing up in Missouri, he developed a passion for understanding thunderstorms, tornadoes, and winter storms. Several personal experiences at a young age put him dangerously close to these incredible forces of nature. Upon graduating from the University of Missouri, he continued tracking the extreme weather for 8 years as the Morning Meteorologist for the ABC and FOX22 affiliates in Mid-Missouri. In 2011, he couldn't resist the challenge to head south and take on tracking tropical storms. He accepted a position with the University of Florida's Multimedia Properties as the Chief Meteorologist. He first developed a 24-hour weather, news, and sports channel whereby students can gain real-world experience on their journey to becoming broadcast meteorologists. In 2013, Jeff worked with stations all over the state to build the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, a collaborative effort by all public media in the state to keep their audiences informed of hazardous tropical weather. In his free time, Jeff enjoys playing tennis, working out, exploring nature, and occasionally sleeping.