FLORIDA
STORMS
Tropical Storm Victor
LOCATED
745 MI WSW OF THE CABO VERDE ISLANDS
WINDS
65 MPH
PRESSURE
997 MB
MOVING
WNW AT 13 MPH
From the National Hurricane Center at 500 PM AST Fri Oct 01 2021
Victor losing organization over the eastern tropical Atlantic.
TAP LINKS BELOW TO FOCUS
Alerts
hazards
summary
DISCUSSION

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

None.

None.

At 500 PM AST (2100 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Victor was located near latitude 12.0 North, longitude 34.3 West. Victor is moving toward the west northwest near 13 mph (20 km/h). The forward speed of the tropical storm has slowed and a turn to the northwest is anticipated by tomorrow. Victor is then expected to move northwestward over the weekend and into early next week with slight fluctuations in forward speed. Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph (100 km/h) with higher gusts. Victor is expected to gradually weaken over the next 72 hours. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km) from the center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 997 mb (29.44 inches).

At 500 PM AST (2100 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Victor was located near latitude 12.0 North, longitude 34.3 West. Victor is moving toward the west northwest near 13 mph (20 km/h). The forward speed of the tropical storm has slowed and a turn to the northwest is anticipated by tomorrow. Victor is then expected to move northwestward over the weekend and into early next week with slight fluctuations in forward speed. Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph (100 km/h) with higher gusts. Victor is expected to gradually weaken over the next 72 hours. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km) from the center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 997 mb (29.44 inches).

Victor is looking disorganized. Deep convection has decreased in organization and coverage this afternoon. No recent microwave imagery has been available to assess the structure of the storm, but visible images from MET-11 and GOES-17 suggest that the circulation of the tropical storm is still elongated southwest-to-northeast. The intensity estimate remains 55 kt for this advisory, but this is on the high end of the recent estimates and could be generous.

Compared to the large changes made this morning, almost no change was made to the official track forecast this afternoon. The model consensus has shifted substantially back to the right, and now lies very near the previous NHC forecast. Victor is forecast to turn northwestward tomorrow, and then continue on that heading through early next week, steered by ridging to the northeast. The new NHC forecast is very near the model consensus through the end of the forecast. Despite the recent agreement between the NHC forecast and the consensus, confidence in the forecast will remain low until we see better run-to-run consistency in the track model guidance.

Shear and dry air may already be taking a toll on Victor, and SHIPS diagnostics from the GFS and ECMWF suggest that the environment will get worse with time. All of the intensity models forecast that Victor will weaken over the next several days in response to the hostile environment, and this is reflected in the NHC forecast, which is heavily based on the IVCN multi-model consensus. By day 5, all of the dynamical models indicate that Victor will likely degenerate into a trough of low pressure, so dissipation is shown. Several models, including the HWRF, GFS, and ECMWF indicate dissipation could occur sooner than that.

Victor is looking disorganized. Deep convection has decreased in organization and coverage this afternoon. No recent microwave imagery has been available to assess the structure of the storm, but visible images from MET-11 and GOES-17 suggest that the circulation of the tropical storm is still elongated southwest-to-northeast. The intensity estimate remains 55 kt for this advisory, but this is on the high end of the recent estimates and could be generous.

Compared to the large changes made this morning, almost no change was made to the official track forecast this afternoon. The model consensus has shifted substantially back to the right, and now lies very near the previous NHC forecast. Victor is forecast to turn northwestward tomorrow, and then continue on that heading through early next week, steered by ridging to the northeast. The new NHC forecast is very near the model consensus through the end of the forecast. Despite the recent agreement between the NHC forecast and the consensus, confidence in the forecast will remain low until we see better run-to-run consistency in the track model guidance.

Shear and dry air may already be taking a toll on Victor, and SHIPS diagnostics from the GFS and ECMWF suggest that the environment will get worse with time. All of the intensity models forecast that Victor will weaken over the next several days in response to the hostile environment, and this is reflected in the NHC forecast, which is heavily based on the IVCN multi-model consensus. By day 5, all of the dynamical models indicate that Victor will likely degenerate into a trough of low pressure, so dissipation is shown. Several models, including the HWRF, GFS, and ECMWF indicate dissipation could occur sooner than that.

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