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COMMON HURRICANE MYTHS

  • 84% say the wind is what prompts an evacuation
  • 69% believe it costs over $10k to strengthen their home
  • 54% think taping their windows will keep them safe

The following is a collection of suggestions from the National Hurricane Center and Ready.gov on being prepared year-round for the impacts from a hurricane or severe weather.  Having a plan, preparing a survival kit, and knowing ahead of time where to get help could save your life, or at the very least make riding out a storm easier for you and your family.

The easiest way to find your zone is to go back to the "Home" page of this app, then tap "Evacuation Info" on the top right corner of the map.

COUNTY EVACUATION ZONE MAPS

County-wide evacuation route and zone maps are based upon the most up-to-date regional evacuation studies and are intended for general reference. Please note that within many counties, there may not be designated evacuation zones.

DURING AN EMERGENCY, YOUR LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM SHOULD ALWAYS BE CONSULTED REGARDING EVACUATION ORDERS.

Alachua | Baker | Bay | Bradford | Brevard | Broward
Calhoun | Charlotte | Citrus | Clay | Collier | Columbia
DeSoto | Dixie | Duval | Escambia | Flagler | Franklin
Gadsden | Gilchrist | Glades | Gulf
Hamilton | Hardee | Hendry | Hernando | Highlands | Hillsborough | Holmes
Indian River | Jackson | Jefferson
Lake | Lafayette | Lee | Leon | Levy | Liberty
Madison | Manatee | Marion | Martin | Miami-Dade | Monroe
Nassau | Okaloosa | Okeechobee | Orange | Osceola
Palm Beach | Pasco | Pinellas | Polk | Putnam
Santa Rosa | Sarasota | Seminole | St. Johns | St. Lucie | Sumter | Suwannee
Taylor | Union | Volusia | Wakulla | Walton | Washington

STORM SURGE FLOODING MAPS

County-wide storm surge zones maps are based upon the most up-to-date regional evacuation studies and are intended for general reference. Please see storm surge zone atlases below for detailed maps for those counties for which such atlases are available. Please also note that for many counties, there are no storm surge zones.

DURING AN EMERGENCY, YOUR LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM SHOULD ALWAYS BE CONSULTED REGARDING EVACUATION ORDERS. Evacuations are ordered by evacuation zones.

Alachua | Baker | Bay | Bradford | Brevard | Broward
Calhoun | Charlotte | Citrus | Clay | Collier | Columbia
DeSoto | Dixie | Duval | Escambia | Flagler | Franklin
Gadsden | Gilchrist | Glades | Gulf
Hamilton | Hardee | Hendry | Hernando | Highlands | Hillsborough | Holmes
Indian River | Jackson | Jefferson
Lake | Lafayette | Lee | Leon | Levy | Liberty
Madison | Manatee | Marion | Martin | Miami-Dade | Monroe
Nassau | Okaloosa | Okeechobee | Orange | Osceola
Palm Beach | Pasco | Pinellas | Polk | Putnam
Santa Rosa | Sarasota | Seminole | St. Johns | St. Lucie | Sumter | Suwannee
Taylor | Union | Volusia | Wakulla | Walton | Washington

BUILD AN EMERGENCY KIT

Build a Kit

It doesn’t take thousands of dollars or multiple days to do it.  In fact, for far less than that and usually in one day of shopping, you can gather the items necessary to ride a storm and the impact it can leave for many days after.  If finances become a challenge, consider purchasing only a few of these items at a time during the off-season months.

  • 3-day supply of water (one gallon per person, per day)
  • 3-day supply of non-perishable food
  • At least one change of clothes
  • First-aid kit
  • Portable radio
  • Flashlight, with extra batteries
  • Credit card AND cash
  • Prescription and non-prescription medication
  • Sleeping bag, blanket and/or pillow
  • Emergency contact list (on paper)
  • Special items for infants, elderly or disabled family members

Download and Print Complete List

The State of Florida tax free holiday is usually the first week of the season and covers hurricane supplies including batteries, a generator, radios, etc.  View the full list of qualified purchases from the Department of Revenue.

COME UP WITH A PLAN

Make a Plan

Before the season begins, there are many simple tasks you can do to your home that will help to mitigate any damage that could be caused by a storm.

Trimming trees and shrubs can lower the chances that your home will be impacted by wind damage or a power outage.

Clearing clogged rain gutters or downspouts can lessen the impact of flooding or prevent a leak in your roof during a storm.

Purchasing and installing a generator can keep your essential items powered for several days in the event of a major power outage.

And finally, make plans ahead of time on where to store your recreational vehicles, such as your boat or motorcycle.  A public space such as a parking garage may be a much sturdier solution than your driveway or carport.

View other planning tips for the elderly, pets, kids and those with special needs at Ready.gov.

EVERYONE SHOULD...

  • Listen to this station and live reports from the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network to get information on evacuations and shelters available in your area.
  • Secure your home, close storm shutters and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Turn off propane tanks
  • Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Move your boat to land, if time permits.
  • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purpose such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other larger containers with water.
  • Find out how to keep food safe during and after and emergency.

IF YOU'RE TOLD TO EVACUATE...

  • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. Use the Family Emergency Plan to decide these locations before a disaster.
  • If you have a car, keep a full tank of gas in it if an evacuation seems likely. Keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case of an unexpected need to evacuate. Gas stations may be closed during emergencies and unable to pump gas during power outages. Plan to take one car per family to reduce congestion and delay.
  • Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area. Choose several destinations in different directions so you have options in an emergency.
  • Leave early enough to avoid being trapped by severe weather.
  • Follow recommended evacuation routes. Do not take shortcuts; they may be blocked.
  • Be alert for road hazards such as washed-out roads or bridges and downed power lines. Do not drive into flooded areas.
  • If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to. Make arrangements with family, friends or your local government.
  • Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
  • Listen to a battery-powered radio and follow local evacuation instructions.
  • Take your pets with you, but understand that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters. Plan how you will care for your pets in an emergency.

IF YOU'RE STAYING HOME...

  • Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors – secure and brace external doors.
  • Keep curtains and blinds closed. Do not be fooled if there is a lull; it could be the eye of the storm – winds will pick up again.
  • Take refuge in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.
  • Avoid elevators.

IF SEPARATED FROM FAMILY

If you have become separated from your family, use your family communications plan or contact the American Red Cross at 1-800-RED-CROSS/1-800-733-2767 or visit the American Red Cross Safe and Well site: www.safeandwell.org.

The American Red Cross also maintains a database to help you find family. Contact the local American Red Cross chapter where you are staying for information. Do not contact the chapter in the disaster area.

IF YOU NEED SHELTER OR HOUSING

If you cannot return home and have immediate housing needs. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).

For those who have longer-term housing needs, FEMA offers several types of assistance, including services and grants to help people repair their homes and find replacement housing. Apply for assistance or search for information about housing rental resources

IF YOU DON'T HAVE POWER

NEVER use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds, or similar areas, even when using fans or opening doors and windows for ventilation. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas and can linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off.

Use battery-powered flashlights in the dark. Do NOT use candles. Note: The flashlight should be turned on outside before entering – the battery may produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.

Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are sure it’s not contaminated.

Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.

IF YOUR HOME IS DAMAGED

  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
  • Walk carefully around the outside your home and check for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damage before entering.
  • Stay out of any building if you smell gas, floodwaters remain around the building or your home was damaged by fire and the authorities have not declared it safe.
  • Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes. If you have any doubts about safety, have your residence inspected by a qualified building inspector or structural engineer before entering.
  • Wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up to avoid injury.
  • Drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed¬ out bridges. Stay off the streets. If you must go out watch for fallen objects; downed electrical wires; and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks.

Power Companies

 

Recovery Help

  • Housing: Text SHELTER + [your zip code] to 43362
  • Red Cross Assistance (800-RED-CROSS)
  • Insurance Claims Assistance (877-693-5236)
  • Flood Assistance
A Severe Thunderstorm Watch is in effect for Central and West Central Florida until 10 p.m. Friday. A band of strong storms will continue to push through Florida through this evening. These storms could bring with them a risk for… Full story...
ALERTS  
Sources: National Weather Service and Hurricane Center.
Sources: Local emergency managers and NPR stations.
Sources: Local city, county and state traffic divisions.
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